Paleo, Whole30 Recipe: Rosemary Spiced Almonds

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I know what you’re all thinking…”Oh my goodness, next week is Christmas, I need a snack recipe to set out for my friends and family that only takes a few minutes!”

I know! Me, too!

Whole30 is not about snacking yourself through the day, so think of this recipe as a delicious addition to a Whole30 meal (topping a salad or chopped over roasted veggies) and as mercy to yourself when you are famished and only grain-carb-sugar city has come to town.

These Rosemary Spiced Almonds are a cinch to prepare and totally hit the spot when you want that extra depth to your already amazing meal.

RECIPE:

ROSEMARY SPICED ALMONDS

INGREDIENTS:

1 lb. of organic raw almonds
2 Tbs. of ghee
1 tsp. of sea salt
Dash of white pepper
2 Tbs. of fresh rosemary, minced

INSTRUCTIONS:

Melt ghee in a large saute pan on medium low heat

Add almonds to the pan and toss with the melted ghee.

Add sea salt, white pepper and rosemary and toss once more.

Continue to cook on low heat, tossing frequently, until almonds begin to toast, about 5 minutes.

When toasted, remove from heat and allow to cool in a bowl.

Store in a glass jar for about 2 weeks.

And enjoy!

Rosemary Spiced Almonds, 2.jpeg

Mindful Eating #14: Replacing Unwanted Thoughts

Replacing unwanted thoughts (about anything in your life) is a simple and rewarding practice.

Begin with the commitment to notice and observe your thoughts.  Simply notice and observe.  You are only gathering information about yourself right now, you aren’t condemning or teaching yourself any lessons.  It might be helpful to write your thoughts down on paper so you can see them or reread them aloud but you do not have to either of these things if you do not prefer.

When you are comfortable noticing and observing your thoughts, start to pinpoint those that are untrue and negative.  Untrue thoughts might be hard to identify at first so give yourself time to explore what you think.  You can explore by asking yourself questions about specific thoughts.  You can ask, “Is this something that can be proved or is it something I was told to believe?” or “Is this always the case or have I simply always told myself this?” or “What evidence is there that this a hard fact?“.  You can spot negative thoughts easier than untrue thoughts because they will be followed by negative feelings such as judgment, criticism or a general lack of compassion.

After you have pinpointed untrue and negative thoughts, immediately replace them with thoughts that are true and positive.  You might do this by thinking, “Even though I have thought this for a very long time, I know it has never helped me and I will choose to think on something that will be of benefit (your new true and positive thought) instead.

Follow this process up by reminding yourself that every time you replace an unwanted thought with one that is true and positive, you are strengthening your ability to think rationally and positively.  Do not neglect this part!  It serves as a rewarding reinforcement keeping you motivated at replacing unwanted thoughts.  Even if it feels funny or forced, do it.

Here is an example of replacing untrue and negative thoughts you might have when you “fail” or “break” your dietary goals with thoughts that are true, helpful and positive:

Thoughts: “I cannot believe I just ate that.  And so much!  I’m such an idiot.  I’ll never be able to eat right, I’m too weak.  I will just have a bit (but who am I kidding, alot!) more and then start again tomorrow.

Now apply observation, questioning, replacing and celebrating:

Oops, there I go again with untrue and negative thoughts about food and eating.  Let me stop and think about this for a moment.  Why can’t I believe that I ate this?  It is a delicious food and I’ve always enjoyed it and it’s available right here for me to eat.  Most people would surely eat it if they had the chance and they liked it as much as me.  Given this, it might be more strange if I did not eat it at all so it’s actually quite believable that I chose it, but I am not an idiot for it.  The truth is, even though I did not make the best choice right now, I am always capable of eating in a way that supports my dietary goals.  One snack or meal off coarse does not make me a failure, it just means I chose to eat foods or in a way that is not the best for my body.  Thankfully, my body does a very good job at healing itself and this act will not destroy me.  Even if I ate ten more servings of this right now I am not a failure because my food choices have no bearing on who I really am, they only contribute to the health and size of my body.  I have already proven that I can eat correctly (ways that I have decided keep me feeling great) so I know without a doubt that I can eat correctly again.  The reality is, I am a fallible human being, just like everyone else, and at times I will eat when I am not hungry or have foods that do not support my health goals, but right now I will choose to stop eating and do the kindest thing I can think of in this moment, which I know is to not overeat anymore.   I want to feel good when I wake up and I know that continuing to eat will only make me more full, more bloated and more likely to eat poorly again tomorrow.  I am pretty certain that the best choice for me is to end my eating now instead of waiting until tomorrow.  There, now, that was not so bad!  I am learning to replace my thoughts and I am getting better at it!  I think I will clean up and get on with my day.  There are still more things I would like to do.”

This is only one example of replacing unwanted thoughts with truth and positivity.  You can use this practice for any untrue or negative thought and with time it will become more natural and easier to do.

Try it out and leave a comment with your own experiences!

Image from Flickr.

Paleo, Whole30 Recipe: Mom’s Classic Deviled Eggs

moms-classic-deviled-eggs

I’ve been so exited to share a recipe I grew up enjoying because my Mom made it at for us every holiday season…deviled eggs!

I now make these for clients with #whole30approved mayo and I include them on menus….gasp….that fall on non-holiday calendar dates! And my clients love them! Easy to grab, keeps bellies full and it reminds all of us of our Mom’s at Christmas.

RECIPE

MOM’S CLASSIC DEVILED EGGS (makes 24)

INGREDIENTS:
1 dozen organic eggs (I like using extra large eggs)
1/4 cup mayo (@primalkitchenfoods mayo is the best thing to happen to mayo, can I get a witness?!)
2 Tbs. of yellow mustard
1/2 tsp. of sea salt
1/2 tsp. of paprika
Minced chives to garnish

INSTRUCTIONS:

Hard boil your eggs by placing them in a covered saucepan filled with cold water, bring them to a boil, remove the lid, and continue boiling for 12 min.

Once done, run under cold water and place in the fridge to completely cool.

Tip: Hard boil your eggs the day before you make these. You will be glad you saved yourself the cooling time when you are actually ready to “devil” them.

Peel cool eggs and slice each egg in half. I like rinsing my knife in between each slice. Keeps the egg whites clean.

Scoop each egg yolk half into a mixing bowl.

Add mayo, mustard, sea salt and paprika.

Gently mix until the yolks are creamy, spreckled by paprika.

Carefully (or wrecklessly, your choice!) scoop mixture into each hollow egg white.

Sprinkle with additional paprika and minced chives (kitchen scissors work great here).

Serve these little devils on a patter lined with butter lettuce and assorted olives/veggies and I promise you, your Christmas will be just….fine.

Hope you enjoy!

AIP, Paleo, Whole30 Recipe: Juliet’s Whole30 Holiday Green Bean Saute

juliets-whole30-holiday-green-bean-saute

Happy holidays, All! Do you have your recipes for the second half of the month lined up yet? Below is a special holiday side dish that my sweet Sister made me (ok, for the whole fam, not just me!) at Thanksgiving this year. It was delicious and would be the perfect addition to your holiday table. And my Sis gives us all permission to copy!

Tip: As much as possible, get comfy in the kitchen swapping non-compliant ingredients with Whole30 subs such as ghee for butter, coconut milk for dairy, rich homemade broths for wine. You can make any dish Whole30 with a little editing.

RECIPE:

JULIET’S WHOLE30 HOLIDAY GREEN BEAN SAUTE (serves 4)

INGREDIENTS:

1 lb. of fresh green beans, tips removed (kitchen scissors work bomb for trimming green bean tips!)
1 Tbs. of ghee
2 shallots, peeled and sliced
2 cups of crimini mushrooms, sliced
1 cup of canned coconut milk (full fat)
1/2 cup of chicken broth
1 tsp. of sea salt
A pinch of ground nutmeg (omit if following the autoimmune protocol)

INSTRUCTIONS:

First, blanch your green beans. You can do this by boiling your green beans for 2-4 min (2 min for small beans, 3 for medium, 4 for large) and then transfer beans to a large bowl of ice water. Once cool, remove from the ice water and set aside.

Heat ghee in a skillet to medium heat.

Saute shallots for 2 minutes or until they begin to soften.

Bring heat down to low and add sliced mushrooms, cover and continue to saute for another 3-5 minutes.

When both shallots and mushrooms are soft, add coconut milk, chicken broth, sea salt and nutmeg (leave nutmeg out to keep this AIP friendly) and gently toss together until all is combined.

Add blanched green beans and saute on low until green beans are warm again.

And that is it! A comforting holiday side dish that will leave you and your loved ones feeling amazing!

I hope you enjoy this recipe!

Paleo, Whole30 Recipe: Beef Pho-Style Soup

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Is it cold where you are?  It is chilly in L.A. so I am happy to share this warming soup with you all!

Tip: When making soup I often make my own broth but since @Epicbar has launched the most delicious broths sold in many health food stores, I use it as often as possible. It tastes amazing and supports a healthy gut and happy body. And it saves time! Essential during the full holiday season.

RECIPE:

BEEF PHO-STYLE SOUP (serves 4)

INGREDIENTS:

28 ounces of beef broth (I highly recommend using the Beef Jalepeno Sea Salt Bone Broth by @epicbar)
1 lb. of organic, grass-fed flank steak
2 Tbs. of avocado oil
1 tsp. of sea salt
Dash of white pepper
2 medium zucchini, spiralized or peeled in thin strips with a veggie peeler
1″ of fresh ginger, peeled and minced
2 whole scallions, minced
8 mushrooms, thinly sliced

OPTIONAL GARNISHES:
5 fresh basil leaves, minced
5 fresh mint leaves, minced
5 sprigs of fresh cilantro, minced
Fresh lime wedges
Chopped almonds

INSTRUCTIONS:

In a shallow dish, marinate flank steak in avocado oil and a sprinkle of sea salt and white pepper for at least one hour or overnight.

Heat a skillet to medium high.

Add 1Tbs. of cooking fat (avocado oil, ghee or coconut oil) and allow to melt.

Place flank steak on the heated skillet and allow to sear for 2 (and up to 4 if you like it well done) min/side.

Remove from the skillet and allow to cool on a plate. When cool, slice in thin strips (slice against the grain).

Add broth to a large stock pot and heat to medium.

Add zucchini, mushrooms, minced ginger and minced scallion.

When the broth begins to simmer, remove from heat and serve between 4 bowls and top with seared flank steak and garnishes as desired.

Have you used @epicbar broths yet? If so, how? Please share, I love learning from you all!

Paleo, Whole30 Recipe: Grain Free Tabouli Salad

grain-free-tabouli-salad

Today I am sharing a salad that you can whip up and call Christmas.

Ok, maybe call it Tabouli Salad, but its red and green colors are just asking for a little holiday recognition, right?!

RECIPE:

GRAIN FREE TABOULI SALAD (serves 4)

INGREDIENTS:

2 cucumbers, chopped
1 cup of cherry tomatoes, sliced in half (a serrated knife does the trick nicely)
1 red bell pepper, seeds removed and diced\
Handful of fresh parsley, minced
4 Tbs. of olive oil
2 Tbs. of fresh lemon juice
1/2 tsp. of sea salt
1 tsp. of dried oregano
1 tsp. of Italian seasonings

INSTRUCTIONS:

Whisk olive oil, lemon juice, sea salt, dried oregano and Italian seasonings in a mixing bowl. I like using a baker’s spatula to do this which technically is not whisking but…

Toss cucumbers, cherry tomatoes, red bell pepper and Italian parsley in the bowl until combined.

Serve as a side salad or add 4-6 ounces of shredded chicken breast to make this a complete meal.

Hope you enjoy!

Mindful Eating #13 – Reasons You Have Been Told You Overeat or Binge

Overeaters, similar to bingers, turn to food when overwhelmed before they turn to other activities such as talking to a friend, spouse or therapist, writing in a journal, taking a walk, a bath, a break, painting their nails or playing with a pet, doing some stretching, focusing on their breath, watching a movie or reading an inspiring article.

This is what makes someone an overeater or binge eater.

If you have a habit of overeating or binge eating, think back to a time when you chose to express yourself by eating an abundance of food.  Did you have any other activity options you could have engaged in as you were inhaling a meal that was too big for your appetite?

Chances are you did since you are an adult and it has been many years since another human being spoon-fed you, even if it meant sitting cross-legged and twiddling your thumbs, but you chose to eat instead of another form of relaxation and relief.

Below is a list, not exhaustive, but enough to describe times when someone might feel the urge to overeat or binge.

When someone is feeling:

  • Sad
  • Happy
  • Tired
  • Angry
  • Excited
  • Afraid
  • Bored
  • Anxious
  • Worried
  • Sore
  • Celebratory
  • Lonely
  • Crowded
  • Annoyed
  • Hopeful
  • Resentful
  • Trapped
  • Powerful
  • Weak
  • Apathetic
  • Antsy
  • Exhausted
  • Starving
  • Stuffed
  • Sick
  • Neutral

Notice the wide range of feelings and how some are positive, some are negative and some are pretty dull.  It is often taught that these feelings cause you to overeat or binge.

Think of a time when you have overeaten or binged when you felt one of these things.

Now think of another time you have felt the same way but did not overeat or binge.  This memory is proof that the feeling you recalled does not cause or require you to overeat or binge.  If it did, every time you felt it you would be physically forced to stuff yourself with food, but since this does not happen it is clear that emotions do not demand actions.  This is very good news because on any given day you can feel any (and likely, many) of these feelings and you would constantly find yourself eating past the point of hunger and dealing not only with the overwhelming sensations of the original emotion but also the negative consequences of eating way too much.  You might not have time to accomplish anything if your emotions caused you to eat.

Next, ask yourself that if you never felt the urge to overeat or binge, even when you felt any of the above emotions, would you still do it?

This is a good question to ask because it places the real reason for eating too much on the simple desire or urge for eating too much and not on any emotion that is often blamed for overeating or binging.

For example, physical pain might cause you to cry (authentic moments when you cry from pain occur spontaneously and not from a decision to shed tears) but it will never cause you to overeat.  You may have felt physical pain and cried but if you also overate it is important to remember overeating was not caused by pain and offered nothing to improve your pain.  At best it may have distracted you from your original pain by creating new feelings of high insulin and an overly full stomach.  While you may have certainly had the desire to overeat when feeling pain, the two are only connected when you physically eat too much every time you feel pain and establish a habit-based activity.  If you did not experience the urge to eat too much food when you felt pain you would probably not obey it and, thus, not have a subservient relationship to food.  If the desire or urge was removed and you only felt any of the wide arrange of feelings listed above, you might find yourself overwhelmed or uncomfortable for awhile, but not overwhelmed or uncomfortable and eating too much food.

Thinking through this might be helpful to you as you dig deeper into why you overeat or binge.  Even if you have lived your whole life thinking that you eat emotionally, you can recall times in your life that you didn’t and this can provide you with assurance that you do not have to eat emotionally in the future.

Remember that if you do have urges to eat too much food, it is your right to obey them.  You are in control of what you put into your body (albeit it too much, or too little), and  you are not a worse or better person for what or how much you eat.  If you choose to make a habit out of eating too much, that is your choice.

Realizing you always have the choice no matter how you have chosen in the past will help you practice responsibility with every next bite.

Image from Retro Cleaning.

Mindful Eating #12: Eating for Right Now

It’s a good idea to get in the habit of asking, “how can I be kind to myself right now?” when you are choosing something to eat.

This question is different than, “What should I eat?” or “What am I supposed to eat?”.  There are enough diets in the world to answer these questions.  All you need to do is look any of them up and you can find rules and menus to last a lifetime, you might never need to think for yourself again!

Asking yourself how you can be kind when choosing what you will eat right now is different because it requires you to be in tune with your body’s needs in this very moment.  Not yesterday or tomorrow or last week or next week, but now.

Now might reveal that your body would do well with protein.  Now might inspire you to choose vegetables as part of or even your whole meal or maybe none at all.  It might lead you to more carbohydrates or more fat or maybe less of everything, because right now, you are not that hungry.

Now will unlikely lead to to eat in a manner that is poor for your health.  It’s unlikely that it will tell you to binge or starve or choose foods that make you feel sick.  Now has your best interest in mind and can be used as a compassionate tool to guide your eating.

Staying present and honest in this very moment will help you make the best choices for your body right now.

Your choices might look different than a diet menu or what the next person is choosing, but that is OK because those things never need to be of your concern, anyway.

Let others also choose their “right now” and everyone wins.

If you find that you have a difficult time deciding on how or what to eat, try offering yourself a bit of kindness and ask what would be best for you right now.

Image from Super College Chef.